Current news and events

Uncontrolled membrane repair causes chromosome fragmentation

Marina Vietri, first author
Marina Vietri, first author

In a recent paper in Nature Cell Biology, an international team led by scientists at Institute for Cancer Research and Institute of Basic Medical Sciences shows that uncontrolled repair of micronuclear membranes causes chromosome shattering associated with cancer.
New: The findings has also been covered by the major Norwegian popular science web site forskning.no.

Clinical trials and research projects at Oslo University Hospital related to patients with COVID-19 and SARS CoV-2 infection

On this web page you will find an overview over planned and ongoing clinical trials and other research projects at Oslo University Hospital related to COVID-19 and SARS CoV-2 infection. The information has been retrieved from applications to the regional ethics committee, the Norwegian Research Council, other funding sources, or directly from the researchers behind the projects.

Bicycling the whole of Norway and gathering funds for the Norwegian Cancer Society

Jarle Bruun
Jarle Bruun

Jarle Bruun, scientist from the Lothe group at the Department of Molecular Oncology, decided this summer to have an active vacation with a purpose, so he decided to bicycle the whole of Norway (up and down) to gather funds for the Norwegian Cancer Society and to inspire people to discover on their own what Norway has to offer in amazingly diverse landscapes, culture, food, and last, but not least genuinely refreshing people with fascinating stories to tell.

npj Breast Cancer article from Sørlie's research group:Basal-like DCIS may not be a precursor to basal-like invasive breast cancer

From left: Bergholtz, Lien and Sørlie
From left: Bergholtz, Lien and Sørlie

The incidence of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) has increased dramatically in parallel with widespread implementation of screening mammography and comprises today about 20% of newly diagnosed breast cancers. These non-invasive breast tumors are heterogeneous and many will never progress to invasive cancer.
In an article published in npj Breast Cancer 17. June 2020, Helga Bergholtz, Tonje Lien and colleagues in Therese Sørlie’s group present a comprehensive analysis of gene expression, DNA methylation and copy number data in DCIS and invasive breast cancer and found distinct molecular subtype-specific differences. 



From national report on research and innovation:Anabolic steroids and effects on emotions

Astrid Bjørnebekk (photo: A. Stella Kyed Johnsen)
Astrid Bjørnebekk (photo: A. Stella Kyed Johnsen)

On behalf of the Ministry of Health and Care Services, the four regional health authorities have prepared a report on research and innovation in hospitals in 2019 that presents patient-related research projects from all over the country in a popular science form. One of the selected projects is "Anabolic steroids and effects on cognition, brain- and cardiovascular health". Project leader is Astrid Bjørnebekk, head of the "The Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Research Group" at the Division of Mental Health & Addiction.

 

Sandvig group publishes that changes in the membrane lipids diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid alter intracellular transport

Anne Berit Dyve Lingelem (left) and Simona Kavaliauskiene
Anne Berit Dyve Lingelem (left) and Simona Kavaliauskiene

The membrane lipids diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) can regulate membrane transport by recruiting proteins to the membrane and by altering biophysical membrane properties. The Sandvig group (first two authors Anne Berit Dyve Lingelem and Simona Kavaliauskiene) recently published in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences how changes in these lipids affect regulation of intracellular transport from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus.

From the annual national research report:Research project on circulating biomarkers presented

Kure' project group (photo Per Marius Didriksen)
Kure' project group (photo Per Marius Didriksen)

Oslo University Hospital are presenting interesting research projects in a popular science form, chosen from the annual national research report. Julian Hamfjord and Elin M. Kure, from the "Translational studies with a special focus on pancreatic cancer" project group at the Department of Cancer Genetics, led by Kure, has been interviewed about their exciting ongoing research on circulating biomarkers. 

Pedersen and Raiborg identify mechanism of how cancer cells grow protrusions that promote tissue invasion

Nina Marie Pedersen (left) and Camilla Raiborg
Nina Marie Pedersen (left) and Camilla Raiborg

Metastases are the major cause of cancer related deaths. One important characteristic of disseminating cancer cells is that they develop invadopodia. Invadopodia are actin rich plasma membrane protrusions, which secrete matrix metalloproteinases that degrade the extracellular matrix, allowing the cancer cells to escape the primary tumour site.

In a recent article in Journal of Cell Biology, published online on the 1st of June, 2020, scientist Nina Marie Pedersen and her coworkers in Camilla Raiborg’s project group at Institute for Cancer Research and Centre for Cancer Cell Reprogramming (CanCell), identify a new mechanism of how cancer cells grow invadopodia. Moreover, they show how the matrix metalloproteinase MT1-MMP is transported to the invadopodial tip.

Oslo University Hospital has awarded 6 excellent articles for the second half-year of 2019

From the ceremony
From the ceremony

In order to stimulate excellent research and draw attention to the hospital's research activity, Oslo University Hospital reward outstanding publications every half-year. Six research groups were awarded for their excellent papers published during the second half-year of 2019 on May 29th. Each group received NOK 50.000 for use in further research. The prize winners then gave short presentations of their important findings.

This spring's awards ceremony was marked by the pandemic situation with only a limited number present. In return, the entire ceremony could be followed directly via web TV, and the recording is available.


More news from the archive