Institute for Cancer Research

Kjetil Taskén
Instiute head

Institute for Cancer Research has since its foundation in 1954 played a central role within the field of cancer research both in Norway and internationally. The Institute has seven research departments and more than 320 employees, master students included. About 70% of the employees and projects are externally funded. Read more

Annual report 2017 (pdf):
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Publication overview

Current news and events

ESMO Congress i Munich 19-23 Oct 2018Therese Sørlie interviewed for Dagens Medisin about current trends in cancer research

Therese Sørlie (photo: Anne Hafstad, Dagens Medisin)

ESMO - the European Society for Medical Oncology - is a leading European professional organisation for medical oncology, comprising over 19,000 oncology professionals from over 150 countries.

Held under the tagline “Securing access to optimal cancer care”, the ESMO 2018 Congress takes place on 19 to 23 October in Munich, Germany.

Therese Sørlie - head of the Department of Molecular Genetics and leader of the Breast tumor initiation and progression group - is in the programme committe for basic research at ESMO, and she will chair several discussions during the conference. Sørlie has been interviewed about current trends that will be covered by the meeting for popular Norwegian health newpaper "Dagens Medisin", and she presents her views in an article entitled "Towards less cancer treatment".

Guro E. Lind new leader of The Norwegian Association of Researchers (Forskerforbundet)

Guro E. Lind

Professor Guro Elisabeth Lind, head of the Epigentics research group at the Department of Molecular Oncology, has been elected as new leader in "Forskerforbundet" - The Norwegian Association of Researchers, taking over January 1st 2019.

Lind is a former head of "Akademiet for yngre forskere" (The Young Academy of Norway) and has also been a local representative for Forskerforbundet. She will be the first female leader since the 80's, and replaces Petter Aaslestad, who has been in charge of the Research Association for the last six years (two periods).

"I was very much in doubt, first and foremost because I am an active researcher with a research group and exciting projects. But I am also actively engaged in research policy and could not say no to this exciting challenge", Lind says to Khrono.

EMBO J paper from Maja Radulovic: Repair of damaged lysosomes keeps cells alive

Maja Radulovic

In a recent paper in EMBO Journal, postdoc Maja Radulovic and her co-workers in Harald Stenmark's group reveal a novel mechanism that promotes cell survival, namely repair of damaged lysosomes.

Work in Harald Stenmark's group has previously shown that a protein machinery known as endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) mediates important cellular functions such as lysosomal downregulation of growth factor receptors and sealing of the nascent nuclear envelope during mitotic exit 

Now, postdoc Maja Radulovic and her co-workers in Stenmark's group have found that ESCRT proteins repair damaged lysosomes, and that this is essential for cell viability upon lysosomal damage. Compounds that selectively damage lysosomes of cancer cells are in clinical trials as cancer drugs, and the newly discovered mechanism may provide us with tools to increase the efficacy of such drugs.

An article published in Cell by a research team from Oslo and Zürich reveals a new aspect of chromosome biology:To spread or not to spread?

Pierre Chymkowitch (left) and Jorrit Enserink

Although the mechanisms that mediate chromosome condensation have been extensively studied for decades, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that initiate and control chromosome condensation at mitosis entry. Furthermore, how cells discriminate between normal chromosomes and potentially harmful non-chromosomal DNA during mitosis remains mysterious.

A collaborative work by the groups of Jorrit M. Enserink (OuH), Pierre Chymkowitch (OuH) and Yves Barral (ETH, Zurich, Switzerland) suggesting that centromeres play a so-far under-explored role in chromosome condensation and immunity mechanisms is published in Cell and now available online.

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