Institute for Cancer Research

Institute for Cancer Research has since its foundation in 1954 played a central role within the field of cancer research both in Norway and internationally. The Institute has seven research departments and more than 320 employees, master students included. About 70% of the employees and projects are externally funded. Read more

Kjetil TaskénInstitute Head
Kjetil Taskén
Institute Head

Scientific production - Institute for Cancer Research

 PublicationsDoctoral theses
2018 so far 
2017209 
 2016228 15
201522321
201417825

Annual report 2016 (pdf):
download in single page format - double page (broad) format

 
Page visits: 189982

Current news and events

Updated:King Olav V´s Cancer Research Prize for 2018 to Vessela Kristensen

Vessela Kristensen (Photo: Nicki Twang)
Vessela Kristensen (Photo: Nicki Twang)

King Olav V's cancer research award for 2018 went to professor Vessela Kristensen, head of the Cancer Genome Variation Group at the Department of Cancer Genetics at the Institute for Cancer Research.

The prestigious prize was handed over by HM Kong Harald V on behalf of the Norwegian Cancer Society in Oslo on April 16th. 

New: The Norwegian Cancer Society has recently published a feature article about Vessela Kristensen and her research.

 

European Research Council Advanced Grant to Stenmark for the second time

Professor Harald Stenmark. Foto: Øystein Horgmo, UiO
Professor Harald Stenmark. Foto: Øystein Horgmo, UiO

Professor Harald Stenmark, head of the "Cellular membrane dynamics" group at the Department of Molecular Cell Biology, receives ERC Advanced Grant for the second time. Only two other Norwegian researchers, Professor Edvard Moser (NTNU) and Professor Kenneth Hugdahl (UiB), have received ERC Advanced Grant twice in their careers.

The research project "Coincidence detection of proteins and lipids in regulation of cellular membrane dynamics (CODE)" will last for five years and has been awarded 2.5 million Euro.

 

Mini symposium Cancer Genomics, April 17th, 10am-4pmOn the occasion of King Olav V's award to Professor Vessela N. Kristensen

On the occasion of King Olav V's award 2018 to professor Vessela N. Kristensen there will be held a mini symposium  on cancer genomics April 17th at 10am-4pm in the Auditorium at the Institute for Cancer Research, in the K building at Montebello.
Speakers are prominent scientists Olga Troyanskaya, Charles Vaske, Sampsa Hautanemi, Diether Lambrechts, Gyan Bhanot, Peter Fasching and Zohar Yakhini.

 

 

Novel subtype-specific prognostic associations of KRAS and BRAF mutations revealed in colorectal cancer

First author Jørgen Smeby with co-author Ina A. Eilertsen
First author Jørgen Smeby with co-author Ina A. Eilertsen

In a recent publication in Annals of Oncology (journal impact factor 11.9) by Jørgen Smeby and colleagues in the Lothe lab at the Department of Molecular Oncology, integration of gene expression-based subtyping and microsatellite instability status led to discovery of novel subtype-specific prognostic associations of the thoroughly investigated KRAS and BRAFV600E mutations in primary colorectal cancer (CRC).

 

Jon Amund Kyte "Researcher of the Month"

Jon Amund Kyte (photo: Elin B. Øvrebø)
Jon Amund Kyte (photo: Elin B. Øvrebø)

Jon Amund Kyte, leader of the "Translational cancer immunotherapy" project group at the Department of Cancer Immunology at the Institute for Cancer Research, was appointed "Researcher of the Month" for February 2018 by the South-Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority (Helse Sør-Øst RHF). 
The group aims to develop improved cancer treatment based on two particularly promising strategies for immunotherapy. This research is presented in a feature article published on the home page of Helse Sør-Øst.

 

International Women's day, March 8th 2018:The Challenges women face in pursuing a career in STEM (science/technology/engineering/mathematics)

Guro E. Lind (photo: Terje Heiestad)
Guro E. Lind (photo: Terje Heiestad)
Global Engage has interviewed Guro E. Lind, group leader at the Department of Molecular Oncology.
 
"In order to achieve gender balance we should focus on why the system is failing recruiting the brilliant young female scientists, rather than discuss what the females should do to increase their chances of a scientific career. It is nothing wrong with our education, skill set or ambitions - it is the system that is flawed"