Institute for Cancer Research

 

Institute for Cancer Research has since its foundation in 1954 played a central role within the field of cancer research both in Norway and internationally. The Institute has seven research departments and more than 320 employees, master students included. About 70% of the employees and projects are externally funded.

The Institute has internationally strong research groups within biochemistry, cell and tumor biology, genetics, radiation biology, immunology and cancer prevention. For more than 30 years there has been a close interaction between researchers at the Institute and cancer surgeons, oncologists and pathologists. This emphasis on translational science has resulted in numerous clinical protocols based on in-house research, and the Institute is a key partner in the Comprehensive Cancer Center, organizationally under the Division of Surgery and Cancer Treatment at Oslo University Hospital.

Gunnar Sæter<br>Scientific director
Gunnar Sæter
Scientific director

Scientific production - Institute for Cancer Research

  Publications Doctoral theses
 2016  so far  
2015 220 21
2014 176 25
2013 197 27
2012 175 18
2011 201 22

Annual report 2015 (pdf format)

 

Latest news

Jonathan M. Irish speaks at CCB seminar August 31st at 12:00:

Decoding human tumor microenvironments and healthy tissues using high dimensional single cell mass cytometry

 
Jonathan M. Irish
Jonathan M. Irish

The CCB seminar Wednesday 31st of August will be held by Jonathan M. Irish, Ph.D., Assistant Professor at the Department of Cancer Biology and the Department of Pathology, Microbiology, & Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee.
Title of his talk: Decoding human tumor microenvironments and healthy tissues using high dimensional single cell mass cytometry
Time and place: Wednesday the 31st of August at 12:00 hrs, Auditorium, New research building, Institute for Cancer Research, Montebello.
Refreshments are served in the lobby after the seminar

 
 

Seminar at OUS, Radiumhospitalet, 1. September 2016. 13:00-15:15

CyTOF opening seminar featuring Jonathan Irish

 

Mass cytometry (CyTOF) is called the next-generation flow cytometry, combining time-of-flight mass spectrometry with metal-labeling technology to enable measurement of up to 135 parameters on single cells. The seminar is open to everyone and will highlight the possibilities of this breakthrough technology that is now available through the Flow Cytomery Core Facility.

Time: Thursday September 1, 2016. 13:00 – 15:15
Place: Auditorium, Forskningsbygget, Radiumhospitalet

 
 

POLE proofreading domain mutations identify a subset of immunogenic colorectal cancers with excellent prognosis

 
Ragnhild A. Lothe and Arild Nesbakken
Ragnhild A. Lothe and Arild Nesbakken

A multicentre biomarker study, including data from the research teams of professors Ragnhild A. Lothe and Arild Nesbakken at the K.G.Jebsen Colorectal Cancer Research Centre, OUH, was recently published in Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology.
A small subgroup of patients with exceptionally mutated (ultramutated) cancers caused by mutations that impair DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE) proofreading are shown to have excellent prognosis.

 
 

Clinical Cancer Research highlights biomarker paper from Lyng’s group

 
Christina Sæten Fjeldbo (first author)
Christina Sæten Fjeldbo (first author)

Molecular targeting of tumor hypoxia is a promising strategy for improving the radiotherapy of cervical cancer. A biomarker for classifying patients according to hypoxia is, however, lacking and is an important requirement for reliable drug evaluation and to avoid added toxicity to patients with no expected benefit.
In a study published in Clinical Cancer Research (journal impact factor 8.7), postdoc Christina S. Fjeldbo (photo) in Lyng’s group and colleagues at Oslo University Hospital and Aarhus University Hospital present a hypoxia classifier that is reflected in diagnostic DCE-MR images and based on the expression level of six genes in a biopsy.

 
 

The Norwegian Cancer Genomics Consortium participates in international study of gene variants predisposing for cancer development.

 
Ola Myklebost
Ola Myklebost

Norwegian Cancer Genomics Consortium (NCGC) consists of clinicians and specialised cancer research groups, situated at the Norwegian University Hospitals, and is led by professor Ola Myklebost (photo) from the Department of Tumor Biology at Oslo University Hospital.
The NCGC participates in an international study of gene variants predisposing for cancer development. Findings from the study has recently been published in Lancet Oncology (journal impact factor 24.69). The article - entitled "Monogenic and polygenic determinants of sarcoma risk: an international genetic study" has also got an editorial comment: "Are sarcomas hereditary?".

 
 

The Norwegian Cancer Society calls attention to collaborative study on relevance of genetic heterogeneity

 
Anita Sveen is heavily involved in the study (photo Terje Heiestad)
Anita Sveen is heavily involved in the study (photo Terje Heiestad)

The Norwegian Cancer Society has recently presented a research project on their home page where researchers from Oslo and Bergen have performed genetic analyses on cancer cells that have spread from the gut to the liver. The results show that the degree of genetic heterogenenity between the metastases to the liver may reveal important prognostic information.. The study led by Ragnhild A. Lothe from the Department of Moleceular Oncology at OUS and Per Eystein Lønning from Haukeland University Hospital.