Institute for Cancer Research

 

Institute for Cancer Research has since its foundation in 1954 played a central role within the field of cancer research both in Norway and internationally. The Institute has seven research departments and more than 320 employees, master students included. About 70% of the employees and projects are externally funded. Read more

Harald Stenmark<br>Acting Inst. Head
Harald Stenmark
Acting Inst. Head

Scientific production - Institute for Cancer Research

  Publications Doctoral theses
2017 so far  
 2016 235  15
2015 221 21
2014 174 25

Annual report 2015 (pdf format)

 

Latest news

Less expensive medicine results in treatment for more patients

Norwegian research with international impact

 
Lancet article Norwegian co-authors
Lancet article Norwegian co-authors

A Norwegian randomized clinical trial shows that it is safe to change from expensive originator medicine to a less expensive biosimilar product. The effect is the same but the costs are reduced more than 50% in Norway. This means that more patients can receive this important treatment. The results of the study are now published in one of the world’s most recognised medical journals, The Lancet (journal impact factor 44.0). The findings have been covered by the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK).
Scientists participating in the study affiliated to Oslo University Hospital were Merete Lorentzen (shared first authorship), Knut Lundin and Nils Bolstad.

 
 

The 2017 Excellent Research Awards to Kirsten Sandvig, Johannes Espolin Roksund Hov and Tor Paaske Utheim

 
From left: Johannes Espolin Roksund Hov, Kirsten Sandvig and Tor Paaske Utheim.
From left: Johannes Espolin Roksund Hov, Kirsten Sandvig and Tor Paaske Utheim.

Three scientists received awards for their outstanding research at a ceremony taking place at Oslo University Hospital May 5th.

The major prize - the "Excellent Researcher Award" - went to professor Kirsten Sandvig.
Johannes Espolin Roksund Hov and Tor Paaske Utheim both received the "Early Career Award".

The prize money - 300.000 and 150.000 NOK respectively - is earmarked for research activities. This prize is distributed anually in order to honour excellent scientific work.

 
 

New insight into late effects after cancer treatment presented by the Norwegian Cancer Society

 
Cecilie Kiserud
Cecilie Kiserud

The Norwegian Cancer Society present research they support regularly, in a popular science form, and they have recently published a feature article on late effects after cancer treatment.
Cecilie Kiserud, head of the National Advisory Unit on Late Effects after Cancer Treatment at the Department of Oncology, has been interviewed about their research activites and new insight into life after cancer, a field that has gained more attention the recent years.

 
 

Study on replication fork stability from Skarstad group published in Nucleic Acids Research

 
First authors Ida B. Pedersen (left) and Emily Helgesen
First authors Ida B. Pedersen (left) and Emily Helgesen

Replication forks must be stabilized in order to avoid DNA breakage and recombination. In a study recently published in Nucleic Acids Research (journal impact factor 9.2), entitled “SeqA structures behind Escherichia coli replication forks affect replication elongation and restart mechanisms“, researchers in the Skarstad group show that double strand breaks are generated in the absence of fork-trailing SeqA structures and that cells then have lost the ability to perform direct (RecA-independent) restart of replication forks.
The two first authors are Ida Benedikte Pedersen and Emily Helgesen (photo).

 
 

The AACR-WICR Friend Lectureship presented to Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale

 
A-L. Børresen-Dale
A-L. Børresen-Dale

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) - Women in Cancer Research (WICR) Charlotte Friend Memorial Lectureship was established in 1998 in honour of renowned virologist and discoverer of the Friend virus, Dr. Charlotte Friend. The WICR Friend Lectureship is presented to an outstanding scientist who has made meritorious contributions to the field of cancer research and who has, through leadership or by example, furthered the advancement of women in science.
Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale, professor emerita at the Department of Cancer Genetics at the Institute for Cancer Research, OUH, has been chosen as the 20th Annual Award Recipient. Her award lecture will be held on April 3rd in the Washington Convention Center.

 
 

A retrospective pooled biomarker study to predict overall survival beyond the TNM system

 
Researchers Stine Aske Danielsen and Anita Sveen.
Researchers Stine Aske Danielsen and Anita Sveen.

K.G.Jebsen Colorectal Cancer Research Centre scientists participated with data from patients admitted to OUH in a multicenter study of >7000 stage II and III CRC recently reported in Annals of Oncology (Dienstmann et al).
Incorporation of MSI, BRAFV600E and KRAS mutation status to overall survival models with TNM staging improves the ability to precisely prognosticate in stage II and III CC patients, but only modestly increases prediction accuracy in multivariable models that include clinicopathological features, particularly in chemotherapy-treated patients.