Kristian Berg awarded the 2007 Pater-Leander-Fischer prize for PCI paper

<p>Kristian Berg</p>

Kristian Berg

Kristian Berg and his team – the PCI group at the Department of Radiation Biology – has recently been awarded the 2007 Pater-Leander-Fischer prize for the paper “Photochemical internalization (PCI): A novel technology for activation of endocytosed therapeutic agents”. This article was judged by the "Deutsche Gesellschaft für  (DGLM) as the best publication in the journal “Medical Laser Application”.

Kristian Berg received the Pater-Leander-Fischer prize during the 16th Annual Meeting of the DGLM, which took place in Munich from 17th to 18th of June in Munich, where he also gave a lecture.

Berg emphasizes that their scientific progress in the PCI field is a result of a group effort.


Links:

The prize-winning article
(link to PDF version from ScienceDirect)
Kristian Berg, Anders Høgset, Lina Prasmickaite, AnetteWeyergang, Anette Bonsted, Andreas Dietze, Pei-Jen Lou, Stephen Bown, Ole-JacobNorum, Hanne Mali Thesen Møllergård, Pål Kristian Selbo.
Photochemical internalization (PCI): A novel technology for activation of endocytosed therapeutic agents
Medical Laser Application 21 (2006) 239–250

Press release, from the DGLM (in German)

Medical Laser Application (issue where the prize-winning article was published, from Science Direct)

The PCI group
(radium.no/berg), led by Kristian Berg

The Department of Radiation Biology


The Institute for Cancer Research


Photochemical Internalization (PCI):

Co-administration of drugs Endocytosis Sequestration of drug



ROS generation Cytosolic release (PCI) Drug-target interaction


Figure: Photochemical internalization (PCI) is an efficient drug (D) delivery system based on photodynamic therapy (PDT), a photochemical method generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) after light activation of a photosensitizer (S). The main PDT-induced ROS product is singlet oxygen, which can destroy a number of biomolecules including membrane lipids and proteins of endosomes and lysosomes. Photochemical disruption of endocytic vesicles leads to release of the drug to the cytosol where it can reach its targets (T).
(click on individal images for slightly larger versions)