MRI

MR-image showing the distribution of blood volume in a human tumor xenograft. The mouse body is observed out to the right. Tumor regions having a high blood volume are indicated by red, while blue indicates regions with a low blood volume.
MR-image showing the distribution of blood volume in a human tumor xenograft. The mouse body is observed out to the right. Tumor regions having a high blood volume are indicated by red, while blue indicates regions with a low blood volume.

Magnetic resonance is an excellent technique for imaging of soft tissues. This imaging technique is widely used in cancer diagnostics to obtain anatomical information about tumors. During the last years, there has also been an increasing interest in using MRI to obtain physiological information about tumors, i.e., functional MRI. Our group has access to excellent equipment for functional MRI. We are in the process of establishing procedures for imaging of angiogenesis, blood perfusion, blood volume, microvascular permeability, hypoxia, extracellular pH and interstitial fluid pressure in tumor tissue, using human tumor xenografts as preclinical models of cancer. Clinical studies of canine tumors and human cervix carcinomas have also been initiated.

 
Jan 2, 2004 Page visits: 5281