NORMENT study published in Nature Neuroscience:

Early signs of mental illness in the developing brain

Tobias Kaufmann (left) and Lars T. Westlye
Tobias Kaufmann (left) and Lars T. Westlye

Like a fingerprint, the connections of the human brain render us distinct from one another. In a study published in the February 20th issue of Nature Neuroscience (journal impact factor 16.7), entitled "Delayed stabilization and individualization in connectome development are related to psychiatric disorders", researchers at NORMENT reveal that such a unique, fingerprint-like pattern evolves during development and is sensitive to mental health. First and last authors are Tobias Kaufmann and Lars T. Westlye (photo).
The study has already gained attention, and the results have been discussed in articles published in Science Daily and Medical News Today.

Links:

The article:
Delayed stabilization and individualization in connectome development are related to psychiatric disorders.
Kaufmann T, Alnæs D, Doan NT, Brandt CL, Andreassen OA, Westlye LT.
Nat Neurosci. 2017 Feb 20. doi: 10.1038/nn.4511.
PMID: 28218917

Mention in Science Daily and Medical News Today ("Fingerprinting young brains: New leads for mental disorders")

Translation psychiatry group, headed by Ole A. Andreassen

The news article from the home page of the Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research (Norment) at UiO: 
Early signs of mental illness in the developing brain

Norment research home page at UiO