Research seminars Thursday September 6th

Elaine Mardis and Mina Bissell

Mardis (left) and Bissell
Mardis (left) and Bissell

Hydro lecturer Elaine Mardis, who is Director of Technology Development, at the Genome Center at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, will hold two lectures, entitled "Massively Parallel Sequencing Technologies: Fundamentals and Applications" and "Use of Next-generation Sequencing and Analysis in Cancer Therapy Decisions" respectively.

Mina Bissell, Professor and Distinguished Scientist at the Life Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, will lecture over the subject "The overarching role of the ECM and its receptors in homeostasis and breast cancer".

The lectures are held in the Auditorium at the Institute for Cancer Research, starting at 9.30 a.m.

Program for research seminars, Thursday September 6th, 2012
Auditorium, Institute for Cancer Research,  FOBY, Montebello

Hydro Lecturer: Elaine Mardis

9.30 -10.30 : Massively Parallel Sequencing Technologies: Fundamentals and Applications

10.30-11.00 Coffee break and discussions

11.00 -12.00 : Use of Next-generation Sequencing and Analysis in Cancer Therapy Decisions

12.00 - 13.30 Lunch, with invited discussants

Elaine Mardis is Director of Technology Development, at the Genome Center at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis. She has over the past years been instrumental in creating methods and automation pipelines for sequencing the human genome. Elaine Mardis is also Professor in the Department of Genetics, with an adjunct appointment in the Department of Molecular Microbiology, and has extensive research in both technology and biology. Dr. Mardis currently orchestrates the Genome Institute's efforts to explore next generation and third generation sequencing technologies and transition them into production sequencing capabilities. She is a key person in the Cancer Genome Atlas and the International Cancer Genome Consortium.


Research Seminar: Mina Bissell

13.30 - 14.30 The overarching role of the ECM and its receptors in homeostasis and breast cancer

Mina Bissell is Professor and Distinguished Scientist at the Life Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Mina Bissell has been recognized for her lifetime contributions to the fields of breast cancer research, the enhanced role of extracellular matrix (ECM) and the nucleus environment to gene expression in normal and malignant tissues. These works have ushered and have changed some central paradigms that have strengthened the importance of context in the development of cancer.

Links:

Elaine R. Mardis

Bisell lab